How To Land A Freelance Writing Job


Freelance writing is a fabulous industry that allows you to stay at home and run your own business. Despite the ease in which you can find online based writing work, most wannabe writers struggle to find their feet in this chosen vocation. They often fail to lap over the first hurdle – getting a job.

What stops most aspiring online writers is the guts to “just go for it.” They end up being held hostage by their own fear of failure and never make it past the starting line.

Procrastination is the biggest reason for their failure! Unless you try, you’ll never know whether something could have worked out or not.

In getting back to landing a freelance writing job, let’s see how this could affect you.

You know you are a great writer. You think you can make some money writing copy, but how exactly do you get those lucrative writing jobs you read so much about? Navigating the cyber world of job opportunities is not like other job searches. Internet employers are often one man or woman companies who do not require the same rigid application process of resumes and interviews that you have gone through in the past. In fact you might never meet or even speak to your new employer.

It is quite possible to find work, good paying jobs over the Internet with bosses whom you will never meet in person. So the question is, how do you market yourself without the aid of a fancy resume and your thousand watt smile?

Tips of the trade:

  • Never give up.
    When first starting, you might find some little jobs that do not pay much or even work for which you never get paid. Don’t let that hinder your determination. Sometimes it takes months or longer of having to comb through different websites and doing lots of little jobs to find that perfect opportunity.

  • Be honest with yourself.
    Give some real thought about the amount of work you are able to take on and how much your work is worth. If you think a certain writing job does not pay you what you are worth then politely refuse the offer.
  • Be honest with your potential employer.
    If you read a job description and you do not understand everything that might be expected of you, say so. Most employers prefer someone who is honest and ready to learn than someone who says they can do things and ends up unable to fulfill required tasks.
  • Don’t burn any bridges.
    Just because you no longer want to do a particular job does not mean you must sever a relationship with someone. By the same token if you do not get a job for which you have applied, accept the rejection with grace. Don’t be surprised if those same employers contact you again for other work or if things don’t work out with your replacement.
  • Stay in touch...
    with the freelance writing community. Network with as many people doing different things as you can. Read blogs and forums and ask questions. There are so many avenues to go down in this industry that you need to have several different irons in the fire at all times. It will help you get ahead and be more marketable because you are knowledgeable about what is going on in the community.

You will also find that by simply taking the first step – regardless how silly it might feel at the time – you can start to gain some invaluable industry contacts and even land a great long term job to boot. I have scored some of the best clients by going with my gut feeling. Others have ended up employing my services because they saw my prose published on another blog.

Getting freelance writing jobs is easy. Landing freelance writing jobs that are regular and pay well, requires a little bit more work. Knowing what works for you and how to get your work recognized and valued is the key to getting bankable writing jobs.

Written on 12/27/2009 by Monika Mundell. Monika is a passionate freelance writer and pro-blogger. Her blog Freelance Writing helps new freelance writers to get started in this exciting industry. If you like to work with Monika, feel free to visit her Portfolio site. Photo Credit: Bright Meadow
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